Frequently Asked Questions

Texas HB 300

  • 1

    What is Texas HB 300?

    Texas HB 300 (Texas House Bill 300) was a bill passed and signed by Texas Governor Rick Perry in June of 2011. The bill places stricter requirements on patient health privacy than those required by HIPAA and also expands the definition of covered entities to include those that come into possession of, obtain, assemble, collect, analyze, evaluate, store, or transmit protected health information.

    Texas HB 300 becomes effective September 1, 2012 and requires that employees be trained on it in addition to HIPAA.

  • 2

    Who is required to comply with Texas HB 300?

    According to Texas HB 300, any individual or organization that:

    * engages in the practice of assembling, collecting, analyzing, storing or transmitting PHI;
    * comes into the possession of PHI;

    * obtains or stores PHI; or

    * is an employee, agent, or contractor of a person described in numbers 1-3 above (if they create, receive, obtain, maintain, use or transmit PHI).

    must comply with Texas HB 300.

    The expanded definition of HB 300 means that many businesses and individuals currently exempt from HIPAA will be subject to the requirements of HB 300. For example, lawyers, accountants, schools, researchers, internet service providers, etc.

  • 3

    Who is exempt from complying with Texas HB 300?

    According to Texas HB 300, the following are exempt from complying with Texas HB 300:

    * workers' compensation insurance or any person or entity in connection with providing, administering, supporting, or coordinating any of the benefits under a self-insured program for workers' compensation

    * employee benefit plans and any covered entity or other person, insofar as the entity or person is acting in connection with an employee benefit plan

    * education records covered by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and its subsequent amendments

    * nonprofit agencies that pay for health care services or prescription drugs for an indigent person only if the agency's primary business is not the provision of health care or reimbursement for health care services

    * processing of certain payment transactions by financial institutions

    * certain information relating to offenders with mental impairments

    * any person or entity in connection with providing, administering, supporting, or coordinating any of the benefits regarding compensation to victims of crime

  • 4

    Does your training satisfy Texas HB 300 as well as HIPAA?

    Yes our training covers both HIPAA as well as Texas HB 300. We have a separate chapter that specifically covers Texas HB 300.

  • 5

    How do I signup for the Texas version of the training?

    First select the proper training category from the products menu (ie, HIPAA for Healthcare Providers, HIPAA for Business Associates, etc). Once you choose the category, there should be a texas icon on the right hand side of the page which you can click on to go to the Texas HB 300 versions of the training.

    You can also click on the links below to go directly to the Texas HB 300 versions of the training:

    HIPAA and Texas HB 300 Training for Healthcare Providers
    HIPAA and Texas HB 300 Training for Mental Health
    HIPAA and Texas HB 300 Training for Business Associates
    HIPAA and Texas HB 300 Training for Insurance Brokers and Agents